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English Curriculum

American Literature

Teacher: Lori Dillon & Jenny Keith
Length: 1 year/1 credit
Course Description: American Literature provides an accelerated program for the capable student in the Language Arts. A focus on American literature forms an integrated program of reading, vocabulary study, grammar, and composition study. Traditional American writings will be read and analyzed to appreciate the literary trends and influences of American authors on the heritage of the United States.

Course Objectives:

  • To enjoy reading
  • To develop the ability to look “into” rather than “at” literature and thus develop his/her cognitive skills
  • To be able to respond to literature in a variety of modes and at a variety of levels
  • To share his/her response with others to enrich the thinking of the group
  • To relate literature to his/her own experiences and view of life
  • To become familiar with representative authors, techniques, and ideas
  • To develop techniques to facilitate the reading and interpretation of literature
  • To develop his/her writing skills
  • To critically examine a specific topic and construct a research paper.

Units of Study:

  • Unit 1: Rebels & Rhetoric
    • "A Danger of a Single Story" by Adichie
    • "A Personal Prologue" by Jim Burke
    • "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman
    • "I, Too" by Langston Hughes
    • "Still I Rise" by Maya Angelou
    • From The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano by Equiano
    • From Exploration Narratives of Cabeza de Vaca
    • From Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford
    • Selected poems by Anne Bradstreet
    • “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards
    • The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    • “Why I Wrote The Crucible” by Arthur Miller
    • “Speech in the Virginia Convention” by Patrick Henry
    • The American Crisis, No. 1 by Thomas Paine
    • “Speech in the Convention” by Benjamin Franklin
    • Declaration of Independence
    • “To His Excellency, George Washington” by Phyllis Wheatley
    • From Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin
    • From “Poor Richard’s Almanac” by Benjamin Franklin
  • Unit 2: Individualism & Identity
    • “The Mindsets” by Carol S. Dweck
    • From Quiet: The Power of Introverts
    • From “The App Generation”
    • “Facebook Sonnet” by Sherman Alexie
    • “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Washington Irving
    • “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
    • “The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe
    • “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe
    • Selected poems by Emily Dickinson
    • Selections by Walt Whitman
    • From Nature by Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • From Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • From Walden by Henry David Thoreau
    • From “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.
    • Selected poems by Fireside poets

  • Unit 3: Dreams & Dissillusionment
    • “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce
    • “The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain
    • “To Build a Fire” by Jack London
    • “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin
    • “An Episode of War” by Stephen Crane
    • Selected African-American spirituals
    • “My Bondage, My Freedom” by Frederick Douglass
    • The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln
    • “Frederick Douglass” by Robert Hayden
    • “In Another Country” by Ernest Hemingway
    • “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner
    • Selected poems by Imagist and Modernist poets
    • The Great Gatsby  by F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • Unit 4: Perserverance & Promise
    • “Doing the Right Thing” by Michael Sandel
    • “He’s Got Success on the Brain” by Curt Schleier
    • “Beauty: When the Other Dancer is the Self” by Alice Walker
    • Selected poems by Langston Hughes
    • “Color Struck” by Zora Neale Hurston
    • “Ain’t I a Woman” by Sojourner Truth
    • “A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty
    • “Courage” by Anne Sexton
    • “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker
    • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

  • Unit 5: Multi-Genre Research Writing

  • Unit 6: Book Clubs

  • Additional Components May Include:
    • Grammar & Mechanics
    • Word Study
    • Writer's Workshop
    • Independent Reading
    • Article of the Week
    • TED Talks (focusing on American voices, citizenship, unit themes, etc. to develop multimedia literacy and critical thinking skills)

AP Language & Composition

Teacher: Lori Dillon
Length: 1 year/1 credit
Course Description and Objectives: The purpose of this course is to “enable students to write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives…[and] to enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers” (The College Board, AP English Course Description, 2008, p. 8). Students will read and carefully analyze a broad range of nonfiction prose in order to deepen their awareness of rhetoric. The course provides accelerated, motivated juniors an opportunity to do college-level work in high school. Students who wish to receive college credit will take the AP exam given nationally each May. These exams, if successfully taken, give college credit to entering students. Students also have the option to participate in the dual credit program with Colorado Christian University to obtain college credit while taking this course. Students will read essays that follow different expository patterns (process analysis, cause and effect, persuasion or argument, etc.) and then practice those same patterns in their own writing. Through this process, students also will develop significant critical reading and writing skills. Since this class is designed to provide college credit, its contents and objectives are closely aligned with freshmen English course offerings in universities and colleges. Expect to spend a significant amount of time outside of class on completing assigned work.

Reading List:

  • Summer Reading: Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
  • Summer Reading: Outliers by Malcom Gladwell
  • 1st Semester: Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Pattillo Beals
  • 2nd Semester: Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  • Each student also will read a non-fiction book chosen from a Book Club list.

Course Outline:

  • Fall Semester: The fall semester’s focus is centered on reading to learn about writing strategies and putting the writing strategies to practice in their own work. Students will analyze published essays, as well as write their own. They will be able to decipher an author’s original audience, purpose, strategies and tone. The students will complete an editorial response assignment, which is ongoing throughout the first semester.
    • Unit 1: Narration and Description
    • Unit 2: Process Analysis
    • Unit 3: Comparison and Contrast
    • Unit 4: Division and Classification
    • Unit 5: Definition
    • Unit 6: Cause and Effect
    • Unit 7: Warriors Don't Cry by Melba Pattillo Beals
    • Unit 8: Editorial Reading Response (ongoing throughout semester)
  • Spring Semester: During this semester students will continue to read essays and analyze the author’s audience, purpose, strategies, and tone. The students also will write a research paper and take part in a book club. The students will read Macbeth and look at arguments used in it and in a variety of other works (fiction and nonfiction).
    • Unit 1: Persuasion and Argument
    • Unit 2: Research Paper: The Documented Essay
    • Unit 3: Macbeth
    • Unit 4: Book Club

In addition, students will keep an assertion response journal over the course of the year. Throughout both semesters, students will participate in timed writings taken from the national AP exams given in previous years. They will also practice analytical reading skills through practice multiple choice tests from previous AP exams.

AP Literature and Composition

Teacher: Rebecca Elmshauser
Length: 1 year/1 credit
Course Description The purpose of this course is to “engage students in careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature… [and to] deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide meaning and pleasure for their readers” (AP English Course Description p.49). Students will also improve their own writing skills throughout this course.

The course provides accelerated, motivated seniors an opportunity to do college-level work in high school. Students who wish to receive college credit will take the AP exam given nationally each May. These exams, if successfully taken, give college credit to entering students. I will not be teaching to the test; rather, I will be trying to equip you with the skills you need to do well on the test.

The literature that we read will span time periods and cultures and will include selections from American, British, and world literature. We will strive to read closely and critically, analyzing a text’s complex meanings based on literary techniques (structure, style, tone, themes, etc.). Students can expect to annotate texts regularly. Writing in response to texts will happen on an informal (journal responses, reactions papers, etc.) and formal (literary analysis papers, literary criticism, etc.) basis.

In addition to writing about literature, students will gain experience in various forms of writing, including creative writing. Students’ writing will take place on multiple purposes, including writing to explain, respond, classify, compare, evaluate, analyze, argue, and persuade. Some of the writing will be done under strict time constraints and some will be written, revised, and edited (by both peers’ and teacher’s feedback) to develop a more polished work and to better understand and appreciate the writing process. I will strive to help the students improve with feedback on various aspects of their writing, such as diction, organization, variety of sentence length and structure, development or voice, and grammar.

Since this class is designed to provide college credit, its contents and objectives are closely aligned with freshmen English course offerings in universities and colleges. Expect to spend a significant amount of time outside of class reading and writing.

Reading List:

  • 1984 by George Orwell
  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • Beloved by Toni Morrison
  • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  • Shakespeare play

Course Objectives:

  • To carefully read and critically analyze literature.
  • To understand the different ways writers use language to provide meaning and enjoyment for the readers.
  • To consider the work’s structure, style, themes, figurative language, and tone.
  • To study representative works from various genres, author, and times periods.
  • To know a few works very well.
  • To write focusing on critical analysis of literature including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays.
  • To understand the social and historical values a work reflects and embodies.
  • To write creatively.
  • To enjoy reading and writing.
  • To be effective communicators.

Course Outline:

  • Unit 1: AP Bootcamp (Essay prep & Short Stories)
  • Unit 2: Frankenstein
  • Unit 3: 1984
  • Unit 4: Research Paper
  • Unit 5: Kite Runner
  • Unit 6: Beloved
  • Unit 7: Poetry
  • Unit 8: Shakespeare

British Literature

Teacher: Jan Hoener and Diane Hollenbeck
Length:
1 year/1 credit
Course Description:
British Literature focuses on the origins and development of the language and literature of the British Isles from the time of the Anglo-Saxons to the Modern World. Included in this focus is an analysis of the history and politics of each time period and how these affected the language and literature of the time. As students investigate historical context of the literature, the role of religion and its impact on early British literature (and ultimately how and why that changed over time) will be explored. The course also integrates vocabulary, grammar and writing, including units on writing the college application essay and writing a research paper.

Course Objectives: For many students, this is their last high school English course before entering college. Thus, every unit will include the development of skills necessary to be successful in their college courses, especially as they relate to analysis and written expression. Specifically, in this course the students will be given the opportunity to:

  • Understand the strong connection between historical context and the literature produced during that time period
  • Look at literary works through the eyes of the author
  • Explore the beginnings and progression of the English language
  • Become familiar with authors that helped shape the language and literature of today
  • Respond personally to literature through the ages
  • Work collaboratively on projects that will enhance the understanding of the literature
  • Develop different modes of reading, note-taking, etc. to fit personal learning styles
  • Develop critical reading, thinking and writing skills
  • Develop scholarly writing skills
  • Conduct research and develop a documented paper that clearly and effectively supports a stated thesis, following steps in the writing process and MLA format
  • Consider their personal faith, Christian beliefs, and Scripture as they encounter different literary texts, worldviews and global issues

Course Outline:

  • Unit 1: Composition skills and writing the college application essay
  • Unit 2: College Ready Reading (summer reading) – Dracula by Bram Stoker
  • Unit 3: Anglo-Saxons
    • Emphasis on Beowulf
  • Unit 4: The Middle Ages
    • Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer and King Arthur tales
  • Unit 5: The Renaissance
    • Emphasis on Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  • Unit 6: The research paper (MLA format)
  • Unit 7: Book Club
  • Unit 8: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century
    • Emphasis on the changing social and political scene
  • Unit 9: The Romantic Period
    • Emphasis on Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • Unit 10: The Victorian Period
    • Emphasis on The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
  • Unit 11: The Modern World

Honors American Literature

Instructor: Rebecca Elmshauser
Length:
1 year/1 credit
Course Description Honors American Literature provides an accelerated program for the capable student in the Language Arts. A focus on American literature forms an integrated program of reading, vocabulary study, grammar, and composition study. Traditional American writings will be read and analyzed to appreciate the literary trends and influences of American authors on the heritage of the United States.

Course Objectives:

  • To enjoy reading.
  • To develop the ability to look “into” rather than “at” literature and thus develop his/her cognitive skills.
  • To be able to respond to literature in a variety of modes and at a variety of levels.
  • To share his/her response with others to enrich the thinking of the group.
  • To relate literature to his/her own experiences and view of life.
  • To become familiar with representative authors, techniques, and ideas.
  • To develop techniques to facilitate the reading and interpretation of literature.
  • To develop his/her writing skills.
  • To critically examine a specific topic and construct a research paper.

Course Outline:

  • Unit 1: Rebels & Rhetoric Rebels:
    • “A Danger of a Single Story” by Adichie
    • “A Personal Prologue” by Jim Burke
    • “I Hear American Singing” by Walt Whitman
    • “I, Too” by Langston Hughes
    • “The Latin Deli: An Ars Poetica” by Judith Ortiz Cofer
    • “Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou
    • From The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano by Equiano
    • From Exploration Narratives of Cabeza de Vaca
    • From Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford
    • Selected poems by Anne Bradstreet
    • “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards
    • “Half-Hanged Mary” by Margaret Atwood
    • “Why I Wrote The Crucible” by Arthur Miller
    • The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    • “Speech in the Virginia Convention” by Patrick Henry
    • “Proclamation” by Thomas Gage
    • Speech by Joseph Galloway
    • The American Crisis, No. 1 by Thomas Paine
    • “Speech in the Convention” by Benjamin Franklin
    • Declaration of Independence
    • “To His Excellency, George Washington” by Phyllis Wheatley
    • From Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin
    • From “Poor Richard’s Almanac” by Benjamin Franklin
  • Unit 2: Individualism & Identity
    • “The Mindsets” by Carol S. Dweck
    • From Quiet: The Power of Introverts
    • From “The App Generation”
    • “Facebook Sonnet” by Sherman Alexie
    • “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Washington Irving
    • “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
    • “The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe
    • “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe
    • Selected poems by Emily Dickinson
    • Selections by Walt Whitman
    • From Nature by Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • From Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • From Walden by Henry David Thoreau
    • “Where I Lived and What I Lived For” by Henry David Thoreau
    • From “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.
    • Selected poems by Fireside poets
    • The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
  • Unit 3: Dreams & Disillusionment
    • “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce
    • “The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain
    • “To Build a Fire” by Jack London
    • “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin
    • “An Episode of War” by Stephen Crane
    • Selected African-American spirituals
    • Mary Chestnut’s Civil War
    • “My Bondage, My Freedom” by Frederick Douglass
    • “Letter to His Son” by Robert E. Lee
    • The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln
    • “Frederick Douglass” by Robert Hayden
    • “In Another Country” by Ernest Hemingway
    • “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner
    • “Winter Dreams” by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • Selected poems by Imagist and Modernist poets
    • “The Turtle” from The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
    • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
  • Unit 4: Perseverance & Promise
    • “Doing the Right Thing” by Michael Sandel
    • “He’s Got Success on the Brain” by Curt Schleier
    • “Beauty: When the Other Dancer is the Self” by Alice Walker
    • Selected poems by Langston Hughes
    • “Color Struck” by Zora Neale Hurston
    • “Segregated from its History, How Ghetto Lost Its Meaning” by Camila Domonskoe
    • “Stereotypes and the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy” via CommonLit
    • “Ain’t I a Woman” by Sojourner Truth
    • “A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty
    • “Courage” by Anne Sexton
    • “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker
    • “Does it Matter if Schools are Racially Integrated?” by Michael Martin
    • “Decades Later, Desegregation Still on the Docket in Little Rock” by Debbie Elliot
    • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
    • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  • Unit 6: Book Clubs
    • Texts will be selected from the following:
      • Eight Men Out by Eliot Asinof
      • Columbine by Dave Cullen
      • Evicted by Matthew Desmond
      • An American Childhood by Anne Dillard
      • Nickled and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich
      • Five Days at Memorial by Sheri Fink
      • The Boys in the Boat by Laura Hillenbrand
      • The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson
      • Stiff by Mary Roach
  • Additional components may include:
    • Grammar & Mechanics
    • Word Study
    • Writer’s Workshop
    • Independent Reading
    • Article of the Week
    • TED Talks (focus on American voices, citizenship, unit themes, etc. to develop multimedia literacy and critical thinking skills)

Honors Intro to Literature

Teacher: Diane Hollenbeck
Length:
1 year/1 credit
Course Description Honors Introduction to Literature is designed to afford each student the opportunity to enhance his/her knowledge in all facets of language arts. Students will be demonstrating and polishing their skills in writing, reading, and speaking. The material used in Honors Literature will not only foster and hone the students’ higher level thinking skills but also prepare the students for the rigorous Advanced Placement classes.

Course Objectives:

Students who work diligently and put forth their best effort will have a strong foundation for future studies in the language arts. The course will enable the student

  • To gain an appreciation of literature as not only a form of communication but also as an intimate look into the human condition.
  • To better his/her comprehension and communication through an increased vocabulary.
  • To hone his/her communication techniques.
  • To develop better written communication skills.
  • To further his/her understanding of grammar in an effort to better written and spoken communication.
  • To heighten his/her awareness of classic and contemporary authors.

Course Outline:

  1. Vocabulary - Independently done through video lessons
    • This portion of the class will be totally independent. Video lessons created from Vocabulary Worshop (Sadler-Oxford) will be online, but questions will be answered in class. Vocabulary review tests will happen every third lesson.
    • Lessons will be due on Monday or Tuesday. Students will have a week to complete each lesson. Due dates will be shared on the monthly calendar.
    • Vocabulary lessons are weighted as assignments; review tests will be weighted as tests.
    • Extra credit will be given if vocabulary words are used correctly in written assignments other than vocabulary assignments.
  2. Literature/Journaling
    • Genres - The majority of the genre work will be accomplished in class.
      1. Short Story (Poe, Hawthorne, Faulkner, Maupassant, Thurber)
      2. The Odyssey
      3. Henry V
      4. Poetry
    • Novels - The reading of novels and the completing of study guides will be homework. Study guides will be weighted as assignments. 
      1. The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Importance of Being Earnest
      2. Great Expectations
      3. The Return of the Native
      4. Lord of the Flies
    • Journaling will combine expository and creative writing, comprehension skills, practice, and reflection of the genre or novel being studied. Journal checks will be weighted as quizzes.
  3. Language/Writing
    • Grammar/Editing - The lessons are intended to be completed in class. Some assignments might need to be completed at home. 
      1. Sentence structure
      2. Verb usage
      3. Pronoun usage
    • Writing - All writing projects will be started and practiced in class. Final typed projects will need to be accomplished outside of class time. 
      1. Letter to self
      2. Class lexicon
      3. Compare and contrast essay
      4. Novel essays
      5. Analyzing a short story and researching the author
      6. Analyzing a poem and researching the poet
    • Grammar assignments will be weighted as homework, quizzes as quizzes, and unit tests as tests. All final writing projects will be weighted as test scores. 
  4. Grading of Work: Homework 20%, Quizzes/Journals 30%, Tests/Writing/Projects 50%

Intro to Literature

Teacher: Tiffany Cox
Length:
 1 year/1 credit
Course Description Students enrolled in English I continue to increase and refine their communication skills. High school students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis. Students edit their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English and produce final, error-free drafts. In English I, students practice all forms of writing. An emphasis is placed on organizing logical arguments with clearly expressed related definitions, theses, and evidence. Students write to persuade and to report and describe. English I students read extensively in multiple genres from world literature such as reading selected stories, dramas, novels, and poetry originally written in English or translated to English from oriental, classical Greek, European, African, South American, and North American cultures. Students learn literary forms and terms associated with selections being read. Students interpret the possible influences of the historical context on a literary work.

Faith Based Objective: Faith is an integral component and/or theme of many literary pieces. Therefore, the student will analyze/evaluate literature/author’s purposes from a Christian perspective. He/she will, thus, realize the important part that God plays in one’s life and the need for such a Christian belief in today’s society

Course Objectives:

Students who work diligently and put forth their best effort will have a strong foundation for future studies in the language arts. The course will enable the student

  • To gain an appreciation of literature as not only a form of communication but also as an intimate look into the human condition.
  • To better his/her comprehension and communication through an increased vocabulary.
  • To hone his/her communication techniques.
  • To develop better written communication skills.
  • To further his/her understanding of grammar in an effort to better written and spoken communication.
  • To heighten his/her awareness of classic and contemporary authors.

Units of Study:

  • Summer Reading: The Pearl- Review and test in Sept.
  • Unit 1: Myth and Fairy Tales
  • Unit 2: Building blocks of literature - literary criticism and terms; various short stories and poems
  • Unit 3: Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis
  • Unit 4: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
  • Unit 5: The Odyssey by Homer
  • Unit 6: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Unit 7: Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien Unit 8: Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare

Integrated Units of Study (year-long):

  • Vocabulary - Vocabulary Workshop published by Holt, Rinehart, and Winston
  • Weekly assignments and quizzes
  • Poetry - Studied and integrated throughout each unit
  • Writing - A variety of writing projects will be required in each unit

Journalism/Yearbook

Teacher: Matthew Zoeller
Length: 1 year/1 credit
Course Description: This is a course in basic journalism with the main focus as well as the end product being the school yearbook. Students in this course can expect to work on several projects during the year involving photography, writing, interviewing, and graphic design. Though students will have lots of autonomy in choosing an emphasis, each team member will be required to know and practice all of these fundamental journalistic skills. The objective of the class is to tell the story of our school this year but the overall objective is for each student to gain real-world valuable skills for their future.

Public Speaking

Teacher: Jan Hoener, Jenny Keith, & Dr John Reeb
Length: 1 semester/.5 credit
Course Description: One of the Lord’s great gifts to us is that of speech. Therefore, the goal of this course is to help you become a more competent and confident communicator. The ability to use clear communication is essential in our world today; therefore one must be able to clearly communicate with an individual, as well as to a group. “Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone.” (Col. 4:6)

Course Objectives:

  • The communicator will be able to distinguish between the two forms of communication: Intrapersonal Communication and Interpersonal Communication
  • The communicator will learn how to prepare for clear communication.
  • The communicator will be introduced to the styles of delivery in clear communication.
  • The communicator will practice and analyze clear communication through the various performances.

Course Outline:

  • Unit : Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Communication
    • What is communication
    • Model verbal and non-verbal communication
    • Listening skills
    • Vocal impacts
  • Unit 2: Clear Communication
    • Topic choice
    • Analyzing the audience
    • Gathering and organizing information
    • Writing clear introductions and conclusions
  • Unit 3: Delivery styles
    • Methods of delivery
    • Making language clear
    • Using visual aids
    • Symptoms, causes, and coping with stage-fright
  • Performance Units
    • One-on-One communication
    • Impromptu communication
    • Informative communication
    • Vocal variety communication
    • Demonstrative communication
    • Persuasive communication
    • Devotional

World Literature

Teacher: Kristen Howe
Length:
1 Year/1 Credit
Course Description and Essential Understandings: In World Literature, students will embark on a literary journey through the tomes of various countries and time periods in an effort to experience how different cultures responded to universal themes. This course is designed to sharpen and expand upon skills developed in previous English courses. Classic world literature will be examined by analyzing works from a Godly, intellectual perspective. Students will also augment their vocabulary and fine-tune their grammar skills with the goal of transforming their thoughts and research into polished formal writing and speaking.

Course Objectives:

  1. To expose students to a wide range of classic pieces of world literature and various styles of writing
  2. To provide students with the opportunity to apply Christian values and ethics to the thoughts of great writers in order that students will both clarify and solidify their own thinking as a result
  3. To improve student vocabulary through introducing, discussing, and practicing the meaning and appropriate usage of new words and word origins
  4. To introduce literary devices, critical theories, and archetypes and examine their usage in a variety of texts from throughout the world
  5. To instill in students the importance of supporting claims with textual support and reliable outside sources, which are then correctly cited in M.L.A. Format
  6. To guide students in producing well-developed essays through the process of forming a thesis statement; validating claims with research, examples, and textual support; being aware of one’s intended audience; understanding the purpose of a piece; utilizing correct grammar; and perfecting work through revision, peer-editing, and various sources of outside feedback
  7. To instill in students a healthy awareness of the variety of content contained in messages that are perpetuated by both literature and the media
  8. To encourage students to express articulate and sound responses to both literature and the media
  9. To prepare students for college-level writing, literary analysis, and discussion
  10. To ignite a life-long passion for literature in students, as well as a clear and thorough awareness of its present-day application to their everyday lives
  11. To develop within students a sense of confidence and pride in connection with their thoughts, words, actions, and immeasurable individual value in today’s world

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze an author’s philosophical theory and belief(s) about a subject and form opinions that may agree or disagree with the author and/or message(s) contained within a text
  2. Analyze recurring themes and literary devices within a work of literature
  3. Evaluate the historical, philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of the period in which a text was written, as well as the impact of these aspects on the author's creation of characters, plots, settings, etc.
  4. Draw comparisons between isolated incidents and broader themes
  5. Comfortably deliver academically sound oral responses to literature
  6. Explain, cite, and/or apply various selections and/or adaptations of texts
  7. Identify, understand, and properly use new, age-appropriate vocabulary words
  8. Research and write responses to literature, formal literary analyses, and research papers, all while correctly making use of M.L.A. Format and standard grammatical conventions

Course Map:

  1. Course Syllabus Review/Introduction to Course
  2. College Ready Reading Review and Test
    1. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society
  3. Unit One: "Origins and Traditions"
    1. "from The Epic of Gilgamesh"
    2. "from The Thousand and One Nights"
  4. Unit Two: "Sacred Texts and Epic Tales"
    1. "from the Rig Veda"
    2. "from the Mahabharata"
    3. "from the Panchatantra"
  5. Unit Three: "Wisdom and Insight"
    1. "from the Tao Te Ching"
    2. "from The Analects"
    3. "from Poor Richard's Almanack"
  6. Unit Four: "Classical Civilizations"
    1. Pantheons of Mythology 
    2. "from the Iliad
    3. "from the Aeneid"
  7. Unit Five: "From Decay to Rebirth"
    1. Inferno
  8. Unit Six: "Rebirth and Exploration"
    1. Shakespearian and Petrarchan Sonnets
    2. "from Don Quixote"
    3. A Midsummer Night's Dream
  9. Unit Seven: "Romanticism and Realism"
    1. "from Faust"
    2. "from The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Dr. Faustus"
    3. "How Much Land Does a Man Need?"
  10. Unit Eight: "From Conflict to Renewal"
    1. "from The Metamorphosis"
    2. "The Bracelet"
  11. Unit Nine: "Voices of Change"
    1. The Power of One

A comprehensive final examination review and test will take place at the conclusion of each academic semester.

Multiple informal and formal writing assignments will be given each semester, including journal prompts every other day, creative writing opportunities, a literary response essay, and a culminating research-based project.

Vocabulary work will take place throughout the school year, with individual units being presented and assigned to students every one to two weeks.

Monthly grammar units will be presented to students via in-class lessons and accompanying activities. This information will then be applied within formal writing assignments.

Course Grades:

Course grades may be tracked at any time in Canvas along with those in all other Lutheran High School classes. The weighted grading categories for this specific course are as follows:

  • Participation (5%)
  • Oral/Writing Assignments (25%)
  • Classwork/Homework (25%)
  • Final Examination (15%)
  • Quizzes/Tests(30%)