<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=561008724262310&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
academics2.jpg

Science Course Breakdown

Anatomy and Physiology

Instructor: Savanna Rogness
Textbook Resource: Visible Body Courseware
Prerequisites: Microbiology, Macrobiology and Chemistry
Length of Course: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: Anatomy and physiology of the human body is the study of the systems that make up the body, which God created, and how the systems function to make life possible. It is an opportunity to learn more about the intricacies and details in which God created us with. This course will include an introduction to the microscopic and gross anatomy of the human body, a survey of each body system, and how they work together in the human body.

Course Outline:
  • Unit 1: Basic Structures of Life and General Homeostasis
  • Unit 2: Integration and Coordination (Nervous and Endocrine Systems)
  • Unit 3: Structure (Integumentary and Skeletal Systems)
  • Unit 4: Movement (Muscular System)
  • Unit 5: Transportation (Circulatory System)
  • Unit 6: Respiration (Respiratory System)
  • Unit 7: Excretion (Renal System)
  • Unit 8: Immunization (Lymphatic System)
Instructional Strategies:
  • Lecture
  • Class Discussion
  • Lab Work
  • Small Group Activities/Projects
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration

Honors Astrophysics

Instructor: Derek Rinks
Prerequisite: Algebra II, Mechanics
Length/Credit: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits

Course Purpose: Astrophysics deals with the historical progression of astronomy and application of physics principles to stellar motion. Topics of study will provide a in-depth analysis of the gravitational, nuclear, and electromagnetic forces that cause the motions of stellar objects. This course will contain a debate formatted discussion of the major theories of astronomical origin including Young and Old Earth Creationist theories according to Genesis 1 and the Big Bang Theory. This course will conclude with a look forward at man’s endeavors to reach other worlds and stars, namely the physics of space travel and the social, economical, and philosophical factors to consider.

Major Course Outcomes:

  • The student will:
    • Develop an attitude of curiosity and wonder when considering physical phenomena.
    • Realize that the Lord caused all of these phenomena to exist for our benefit.
    • Be able to articulate the vastness of the universe.
    • Understand Kepler's 3 laws as well as the conservation laws that explain the motion of the universe.
    • Explain the processes theorized to have formed the solar system, planets, and stars.
    • Be able to articulate how stars work, as well as their life cycles.
    • Learn how to extract information from a variety of sources including information presented in class and the internet.
    • Learn how to progress though material at a college class pace.
    • Develop self motivation and responsibility cvrequired to progress through college level curriculum.
    • Perform the mathematical calculations necessary for the orbital travel of spacecraft.
    • Create a manifesto for the successful implementation of an off-world society in the near future.

Unit Analysis:

  • Unit 1: The Cosmic Landscape
  • Unit 2: Historical Astronomy
  • Unit 3: Light and Nuclear Energy
  • Unit 4: Gravitation and Relativity
  • Unit 5: Time
  • Unit 6: Orbital Physics
  • Unit 7: Space Exploration

Grade Book Breakdown:

  • In-Class Activities and Projects 30%
  • Formal Assessments 25%
  • Homework 25%
  • Class discussions and participation 20%

Certified Nursing Aide Training (CNA)

Instrutor: Megan Reimnitz
Prerequisite: Must be a Junior or Senior and complete the application process
Length/Credit: 2 Semesters, 1 Credit
Cost: Total cost of the class is $150.00. This fee covers the cost of the workbook, background check (required for clinical experience), application for Colorado State Board of Nursing exam, skills video access.
Textbook: Nursing Assisting – A Foundation in Caregiving, by Hartman Publishing Nursing Assisting – Workbook, by Hartman Publishing 
Course Description: This course presents basic knowledge and procedures necessary to perform nurse aide skills as defined by the Colorado State Board of Nursing. Some of the skills include assisting with activity and movement safety, personal care and hygiene, nutrition, and obtaining vital signs. This course also provides students the opportunity to obtain their lab and clinical experience hours required for the Colorado State Board of Nursing. Students have the opportunity to complete the required testing to be state certified as part of their final exam.

Course Outline:

  • Unit 1: Being a Caregiver
  • Unit 2: Legal and Ethical Issues
  • Unit 3: Diversity and End of Life Care
  • Unit 4: Safety and Emergency Care
  • Unit 5: Vital Signs
  • Unit 6: Bed Making and Unit Care
  • Unit 7: Positioning, Moving and Lifting
  • Unit 8: Skin, Muscle, and Personal Care
  • Unit 9: Dressing and Bathing
  • Unit 10: Nutrition and Fluid Balance
  • Unit 11: Circulatory and TED Hose
  • Unit 12: Endocrine and Subacute Care
  • Unit 13: Your New Position and Clinical Experience

Instructional Strategies:

  • Lecture
  • Peer Collaboration and Discussion
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration
  • Skills Lab Work
  • Shadow experiences within the field
  • Clinical experience at outside facility

Earth and Space

Instructor: Mark Rudzinski
Prerequisite: None
Length/Credit: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description:This course in an exploration of Earth’s physical geology, and its place in the cosmic landscape.

Major Course Outcomes:
Students will be able to:

  • use the Scientific Method.
  • make observations and deductions by using their senses to explore the physical world.
  • apply logic and critical thinking to the information they are given.
  • articulate the basic principles behind the Forces that govern our universe.
  • understand the geological Forces that build and shape our world.
  • formulate opinions of Earth's geological and astronomical history.

Unit Analysis:

  • Unit 1: The Earth, Sun, Moon System
  • Unit 2: The Solar System
  • Unit 3: Stars and Galaxies
  • Unit 4: Internal Heat Engine and Tectonic Forces
  • Unit 5: The Rock Cycle
  • Unit 6: Historical Astronomy and Geology Timelines

Grade Book Breakdown:

  • In-Class Activities 25%
  • Homework (assignments and discussions) 25%
  • Assessments (Tests and quizzes) 20%
  • Participation (work ethic and behavior) 10%
  • Formal Lab Reports 10%
  • Logic and Reasoning 10%

Environmental Science

Instructor: Mark Rudzinski
Prerequisite: None
Length/Credit: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description:An exploration of Earth’s ongoing natural processes. The Earth’s weather and energy systems are dynamic features of our planet that undergo changes (seasons and eras) from internal causes and man-made influences on the ecosystem. This course is designed with a unique self-paced Project-Based Learning model that will have student working in collaborative groups to achieve a long-term goal. Please inquire for more details.

Major Course Outcomes:
Students will be able to:

  • work collaboratively with a team for an extended period of time to achieve short-term and long-term objectives.
  • explain the forces that drive the Earth’s wind belts and ocean currents that drive weather and historical transportation.
  • solve problems by utilizing math, finance, and science fundamental skills.
  • speak knowledgeably about Energy Resources (fossil fuel and renewable) and the pros and cons of both.
  • articulate a global perspective about our role as humans made in the image of God to command and preserve this world that we have been given.

Unit Analysis:

  • Weeks 1-2: Mapping and Topography
  • Weeks 3-12: “The Sailing Project”
  • Weeks 13-15: Renewable Energy
  • Weeks 16-18: Global Citizenship

Grade Book Breakdown:

  • In Class Activities 30%
  • Homework (assignments and discussions) 25%
  • Assessments (Tests and quizzes) 25%
  • Participation (work ethic and behavior) 10%
  • Formal Lab Reports 10%

Honors Electricity & Waves 

Instructor: Derek Rinks
Prerequisite: Mechanics
Length/Credit: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Purpose: A study of general physics principles through experiments, lectures, and discussion: Science as a way of knowing – Scientific methodology and practice; mechanics of particles and of waves; momentum, energy and conservation laws; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; light; relativity and quantum mechanics. “I devoted myself to study and to explore by wisdom all that is done under heaven. What a heavy burden God has laid on men!" Ecclesiastes 1:12-14

Course Outcomes:
The student will

  • Develop an attitude of curiosity and wonder when considering physical phenomena.
  • Realize that the Lord caused all of these phenomena to exist for our benefit
  • Operate laboratory equipment in a prudent manner and for the purpose of gathering data to answer a variety of scientific questions
  • Organize data into useful forms
  • Communicate information through the analysis and use of graphs, charts, and lab reports
  • Test ideas and hypotheses that he or she come up with
  • Learn how physics affects us every day in many ways, not simply in the classroom
  • Develop the problem solving and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful in the college setting and beyond
  • Use mathematics with laws of physics to solve problems
  • Solve momentum and energy related to waves problems
  • Discuss waves and wave mechanics, introducing the mathematics of wave motion and wave length
  • Discuss how sound relates to energy, waves and wave mechanics, discuss Doppler effect and other sound phenomena and conduct experiments to understand waves.
  • Discuss light energy, light waves, wavelength and velocity relative oto other electromagnetic energy, light particle theory; solve light energy problems and problems related to reflected, transmitted and refracted light
  • Discuss static electricity, electrical charge, electrical charge fields and electrical charge characteristics, conduct experiments the elucidate the fundamentals of electrical charges, study the Coulomb as a unit of charge and explore charge storage in a capacitor
  • Be introduced to the concepts of electrical current flow (amperage), current pressure (voltage), and current flow resistance (ohms) and be able to show how all three are related
  • Discuss direct current and alternating current and discuss the relationships between magnetic fields and current flow

Performances
The student will:

  • Learn how to extract information from a variety of sources including information presented in class, in the textbook and available on the internet
  • Practice concepts learned through the completion of regular homework assignments
  • Take homework quizzes on a regular basis
  • Take tests after each unit
  • Learn the scientific method of laboratory experimentation through the performance of regular laboratory activities as well as the preparation of complete laboratory reports detailing experimental procedures and results
  • Design and construct up to 2 major projects
  • Demonstrate the phenomenon of resonance through experimentation
  • Study the reflection and refraction of light in laboratory activities and demonstrations
  • Study some basic properties of electricity and magnetism in the laboratory

Unit Analysis

  • Unit 1: Waves and Energy Transfer
  • Unit 2: Sound
  • Unit 3: Light, Reflection, and Refraction
  • Unit 4: Mirrors and Lenses
  • Unit 5: Electrostatics and Electric Fields
  • Unit 6: Current Electricity
  • Unit 7: Magnetism

Instructional Strategies

  • Lecture 40%
  • Class discussion 20%
  • Small group activities/labs/projects 30%
  • Teacher/Student Demonstrations 10%

General Chemistry

Instructor: Matthew Buchholz and Destiny Barreras
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II (may be taken concurrently)
Textbook: Dorin, Demmin, Gabel Chemistry: The Study of Matter
Length/Credit:
 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: An introduction to the concepts of chemistry, the periodic table of elements, compound formation, and atomic structure. Students will learn basic chemistry laboratory procedures as they perform labs throughout each unit.

Course Outcomes:
The student will

  • Be able to articulate how the study of chemistry and being a believer in Jesus are compatible.
  • Use correct technique and methods in taking scientific measurements.
  • Be able to make observations.
  • Be able to apply Algebra and logic to solve problems.
  • Be able to identify the states of matter and describe their properties.
  • Be able to explain the theory of atomic and electron structure.
  • Be able to explain chemical periodicity.
  • Be able to operate safely and effectively in a laboratory setting.
  • Be able to explain energy’s role in the physical world.
  • Be able to explain the history of Modern Atomic Theory.
  • Be able to logically predict an ionic compound’s formula.

Performances

  • Students will learn how to extract information from a variety of sources, including information presented in class, the teacher’s website and various sources on the Internet.
  • Students will take notes in class.
  • Students will practice concepts learned through the completion of regular homework.
  • Students will take homework quizzes on a regular basis.
  • Students will take tests after each unit.
  • Students will learn the scientific method through the performance of various laboratory experiments in addition to the observation of a number of classroom demonstrations.
  • Students will gain practical knowledge in the area of measurement and learn to use a variety of measurement tools through hands-on use of these tools, including balances, graduated cylinders, thermometers and volumetric pipets.
  • Students will identify the various forms of energy and its transformation.
  • Students will describe the changes in Atomic Theory throughout history, including the modern form of the theory.

Unit Analyses

  • Unit 1: Scientific Method and Measurements
  • Unit 2: Introduction to Matter
  • Unit 3: Atomic Structure and Theory
  • Unit 4: Atomic Structure and Electron Configuration
  • Unit 5: Energy
  • Unit 6: Chemical Formulas

Instructional Strategies

  • Laboratory Activities 20%
  • Teacher performed demonstrations 5%
  • Small group work (besides lab related) 5%
  • Lecture 50%
  • Class discussion 20%

Honors General Chemistry

Instructor: Matthew Buchholz
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II (may be taken concurrently)
Textbook: Dorin, Demmin, Gabel Chemistry: The Study of Matter
Length/Credit:
 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: An introduction to the concepts of chemistry, the periodic table of elements, compound formation, and atomic structure. Students will learn basic chemistry laboratory procedures as they perform labs throughout each unit. Students taking this course are expected to have a strong interest in either Chemistry or science in general. An emphasis will be placed on career application when possible.

Course Outcomes:
The student will

  • Be able to articulate how the study of chemistry and being a believer in Jesus are compatible.
  • Use correct technique and methods in taking scientific measurements.
  • Be able to make observations and inferences.
  • Be able to apply Algebra and logic to solve problems in rigorous ways.
  • Be able to identify the states of matter and describe their properties.
  • Be able to explain the theory of atomic and electron structure.
  • Be able to explain chemical periodicity.
  • Be able to operate safely and effectively in a laboratory setting.
  • Be able to explain energy’s role in the physical world both conceptually and mathematically.
  • Be able to articulate the modern understanding of the atomic structure in a conceptual way.
  • Be able to logically predict an ionic compound’s formula and its’ relationship to mass.

Performances

  • Students will learn how to extract information from a variety of sources, including information presented in class, the teacher’s website and various sources on the Internet.
  • Students will take notes in class.
  • Students will practice concepts learned through the completion of regular homework that goes in depth in the unit’s material.
  • Students will take homework quizzes on a regular basis.
  • Students will take tests after each unit.
  • Students will learn the scientific method through the performance of various laboratory experiments in addition to the observation of a number of classroom demonstrations. In addition, students will draw conclusions based on their experimental results and articulate those to the teacher.
  • Students will gain practical knowledge in the area of measurement and learn to use a variety of measurement tools through hands-on use of these tools, including balances, graduated cylinders, thermometers and volumetric pipets.
  • Students will identify the various forms of energy and its transformation.
  • Students will describe the changes in Atomic Theory throughout history, including the modern form of the theory.
  • Students will understand the logic behind electron orbitals and their modeling of the atom.
  • Students will apply the unit called the mole to mass and stoichiometry.

Unit Analyses

  • Unit 1: Intro to Chemistry and Matter
  • Unit 2: Chemistry Math
  • Unit 3: Periodic Table
  • Unit 4: Atomic Structure and Electron Configuration
  • Unit 5: Energy
  • Unit 6: Chemical Formulas
  • Unit 7: Mathematics of Chemical Formulas

Instructional Strategies

  • Laboratory Activities 20%
  • Teacher performed demonstrations 5%
  • Small group work (besides lab related) 5%
  • Lecture 50%
  • Class discussion 20%

Inorganic Chemistry

Instructor: Matthew Buchholz
Prerequisite: General Chemistry
Textbook: Dorin, Demmin, Gabel Chemistry: The Study of Matter
Length/Credit:
 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description:Inorganic Chemistry is a study of inorganic chemistry principles through experiments, lectures, and discussion. Stoichiometry, gas laws, solution formation, theories of acids and bases, and oxidation potentials are all covered. While the mathematical application will be explored, the conceptual will also be covered.

Course Outcomes:
The student will

  • Be able to articulate how the study of chemistry and being a believer in Jesus are compatible.
  • Use correct technique and methods in taking scientific measurements.
  • Be able to make observations.
  • Be able to apply problem solving techniques.
  • Be able to operate safely and effectively in a laboratory setting.
  • Be able to employ the language of chemistry in writing formulas and balancing equations
  • Be able to perform calculations involving chemical quantities, including stoichiometry and gas laws.
  • Be able to explain the theory and solve the quantitative aspects of solutions.
  • Be able to describe and explain ph, acid and base reactions and results.
  • Be able to explain the phenomena of oxidation and reduction.

Performances

  • Students will learn how to extract information from a variety of sources, including information presented in class, in the textbook and available on the Internet.
  • Students will take notes in class.
  • Students will practice concepts learned through the completion of regular homework.
  • Students will take homework quizzes on a regular basis.
  • Students will take tests after each unit.
  • Students will learn the scientific method through the performance of various laboratory experiments in addition to the observation of a number of classroom demonstrations.
  • Students will gain practical knowledge in the area of measurement and learn to use a variety of measurement tools through hands-on use of these tools, including balances, graduated cylinders, thermometers and volumetric pipets.
  • Students will be exposed to how chemistry affects everyday life.

Unit Analyses

  • Unit 1: Mathematics of Chemical Formulas
  • Unit 2: Chemical Equations and Stoichiometry
  • Unit 3: Gas Laws
  • Unit 4: Solutions
  • Unit 5: Acids and Bases
  • Unit 6: Redox Reactions

Instructional Strategies

  • Laboratory Activities 20%
  • Teacher performed demonstrations 5%
  • Small group work (besides lab related) 5%
  • Lecture 50%
  • Class discussion 20%

Honors Inorganic Chemistry

Instructor: Matthew Buchholz
Prerequisite: General Chemistry
Textbook: Dorin, Demmin, Gabel Chemistry: The Study of Matter
Length/Credit:
 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description:Honors Inorganic Chemistry is a study of inorganic chemistry principles through experiments, lectures, and discussion. Stoichiometry, gas laws, solution formation, theories of acids and bases, oxidation potentials, and electrochemistry are all covered. A special emphasis will be placed on the mathematical and logical exploration of these topics. Students are expected to have a strong interest in the topics and pursuing to learn more about chemistry, engineering, medicine, or other related careers.

Course Outcomes:
The student will

  • Be able to articulate how the study of chemistry and being a believer in Jesus are compatible.
  • Use correct technique and methods in taking scientific measurements and record them with proper significant figures.
  • Be able to make observations and inferences.
  • Be able to apply problem solving techniques.
  • Be able to operate safely and effectively in a laboratory setting.
  • Be able to employ the language of chemistry in writing formulas and balancing equations.
  • Be able to perform calculations involving chemical quantities, including stoichiometry and gas laws. These will be more than simply plugging numbers into an equation.
  • Be able to explain the concepts of solutions, as well solve quantitative problems involving concentration. Students will then apply this to formulas, mass, and moles.
  • Be able to describe and explain ph, acid and base reactions and results. Students will mathematically calculate pH and pOH.
  • Be able to explain the phenomena of oxidation and reduction in a rigorous way.
  • Be able to apply Redox in the mathematical exploration of Voltaic and Electrolytic cells.

Performances

  • Students will learn how to extract information from a variety of sources, including information presented in class, in the textbook and available on the Internet.
  • Students will take notes in class.
  • Students will practice concepts learned through the completion of regular homework.
  • Students will take homework quizzes on a regular basis.
  • Students will take tests after each unit.
  • Students will learn the scientific method through the performance of various laboratory experiments in addition to the observation of a number of classroom demonstrations.
  • Students will gain practical knowledge in the area of measurement and learn to use a variety of measurement tools through hands-on use of these tools, including balances, graduated cylinders, thermometers and volumetric pipets.
  • Students will be exposed to how chemistry affects everyday life.
  • Students will use this to explore possible career interests or advanced education in these topics.
  • Students will use math as the universal language in their understanding of topics to relate the visible with the theoretical.

Unit Analyses

  • Unit 1: Chemical Equations and Stoichiometry
  • Unit 2: Gas Laws
  • Unit 3: Solutions
  • Unit 4: Acids and Bases
  • Unit 5: Redox Reactions
  • Unit 6: Electrochemistry

Instructional Strategies

  • Laboratory Activities 20%
  • Teacher performed demonstrations 5%
  • Small group work (besides lab related) 5%
  • Lecture 50%
  • Class discussion 20%

Macrobiology

Instructor: Aaron Rudzinski
Prerequisites: Microbiology
Length of Course: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: Biology is the study of life, which was created by God. It is in the studying of that life that we can learn more about the Creator and the detail in which life is created. The course is an introduction to plants and animals, as well as ecology. The structure, taxonomy, processes of life, and relationships of both vertebrates and invertebrates will be studied. Basic concepts of plant life through a study of the structure, functional form, reproduction and ecology of selected plant groups from the plant kingdom. Laboratory activities will be focused on animals in each of the phyla.

Course Outline:

  • Unit 1: Life Processes and Taxonomy
  • Unit 2: Invertebrates
  • Unit 3: Cellular Respiration
  • Unit 4: Vertebrates
  • Unit 5: Plants
  • Unit 6: Photosynthesis
Instructional Strategies:
  • Lecture
  • Class Discussion
  • Lab Work
  • Small Group Activities/Projects
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration

Honors Macrobiology

Instructor: Savanna Rogness
Prerequisites: Microbiology
Length of Course: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: Biology is the study of life, which was created by God. It is in the studying of that life that we can learn more about the Creator and the detail in which life is created. The course is an introduction to plants and animals, as well as ecology. The structure, taxonomy, processes of life, and relationships of both vertebrates and invertebrates will be studied. Basic concepts of plant life through a study of the structure, functional form, reproduction and ecology of selected plant groups from the plant kingdom. Laboratory activities will be focused on animals in each of the phyla. Students will create an interactive notebook throughout the class that will act as a toolbox of what they have learned, as well as a body of evidence showing the desire to learn, self-assess, and grow. Students will be challenged to explore the subject matter through project-based learning, investigation through questioning, and group collaboration. Students will also explore and discuss issues of bioethics developing a personal philosophy of life.

Course Outline:

  • Unit 1: Life Processes and Taxonomy
  • Unit 2: Invertebrates
  • Unit 3: Cellular Respiration
  • Unit 4: Vertebrates - General Characteristics
  • Unit 5: Vertebrates - Nutrition
  • Unit 6: Vertebrates - Circulation and Respiration
  • Unit 7: Vertebrates - Reproduction
  • Unit 8: Botany - Types of Plants
  • Unit 9: Botany - Anatomy and Reproduction
  • Unit 10: Photosynthesis
Instructional Strategies:
  • Lecture
  • Class Discussion
  • Lab Work
  • Small Group Activities/Projects
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration

Honors Mechanics

Instructor: Derek Rinks
Prerequisite: Geometry
Length/Credit: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Purpose: A study of general physics principles through experiments, lectures, and discussion: Science as a way of knowing – Scientific methodology and practice; mechanics of particles; momentum, energy and conservation laws; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; light; relativity and quantum mechanics. “I devoted myself to study and to explore by wisdom all that is done under heaven. What a heavy burden God has laid on men!" Ecclesiastes 1:12-14

Course Description:
The student will:

  • Develop an attitude of curiosity and wonder when considering physical phenomena.
  • Realize that the Lord caused all of these phenomena to exist for our benefit.
  • Operate laboratory equipment in a prudent manner and for the purpose of gathering data to answer a variety of scientific questions
  • Measure objects, realizing the limitations of the measuring instruments, learn and use the international system of measurement, and convert from one unit to another
  • Organize data into useful forms
  • Communicate information through the analysis and use of graphs, charts, and lab reports
  • Test ideas and hypotheses that he or she come up with
  • Learn how physics affects us every day in many ways, not simply in the classroom
  • Develop the problem solving and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful in the college setting and beyond
  • Use mathematics with laws of physics to solve problems
  • Describe motion in one and two dimensions
  • Describe how position, velocity, and acceleration are related
  • Use vectors and free body diagrams to solve problems
  • Solve momentum and energy related problems

Performances:
The student will:

  • Learn how to extract information from a variety of sources including information presented in class and the internet
  • Practice concepts learned through the completion of regular homework assignments
  • Take homework quizzes on a regular basis
  • Take tests after each unit
  • Learn the scientific method of laboratory experimentation through the performance of regular laboratory activities as well as the preparation of complete laboratory reports detailing experimental procedures and results
  • Gain practical knowledge in the area of measurement and learn to use a variety of measurement tools
  • Learn how to use the metric system for taking and making measurements
  • Graph basic motion showing acceleration, velocity, and displacement vs. time.
  • Design and construct up to 2 major projects
  • Prove, through experimentation, the Law of Conservation of Momentum

Unit Analysis:

  • Unit 1: Intro to Physics
  • Unit 2: Velocity
  • Unit 3: Acceleration
  • Unit 4: Forces
  • Unit 5: Vectors
  • Unit 6: Projectile Motion
  • Unit 7: Momentum and Universal Gravitation
  • Unit 8: Work, Power, and Energy

Microbiology

Instructor: Aaron Rudzinski
Prerequisites: None
Textbook: Understanding the Times and a variety of other current materials
Length of Course: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: Biology is the study of life, which was created by God. It is in the studying of that life that we can learn more about the Creator and the detail in which life is created. The course is an introduction to the structure and functions of cells with an emphasis on the correlation between structure and function at the molecular level. Theories of evolution will be explored from a Biblical perspective to determine how the theories hold up against Biblical Truths. Students will create an interactive notebook throughout the class that will act as a toolbox of what they have learned, as well as a body of evidence showing the desire to learn, self-assess, and grow.

Course Outline:
  • Unit 1: Cell Structure and Function
  • Unit 2: Cell Membrane and Transportation
  • Unit 3: Cell Cycle and Mitosis
  • Unit 4: DNA Structures and Processes
  • Unit 5: Meiosis and Inherited Traits
  • Unit 6: Creation versus Evolution

Instructional Strategies:

  • Lecture
  • Class Discussion
  • Lab Work
  • Projects for Learning
  • Peer Collaboration and Discussion
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration

Honors Microbiology

Instructor: Savanna Rogness
Prerequisites: None
Textbook: Understanding the Times and a variety of other current materials
Length of Course: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: Biology is the study of life, which was created by God. It is in the studying of that life that we can learn more about the Creator and the detail in which life is created. The course is an introduction to the structure and functions of cells with an emphasis on the correlation between structure and function at the molecular level. Theories of evolution will be explored from a Biblical perspective to determine how the theories hold up against Biblical Truths. Students will create an interactive notebook throughout the class that will act as a toolbox of what they have learned, as well as a body of evidence showing the desire to learn, self-assess, and grow. Students will be challenged to explore the subject matter through project based learning, investigation through questioning, and group collaboration. Students will also explore and discuss issues of bioethics developing a personal philosophy of life.

Course Outline:
  • Unit 1: What is truth? Science and Faith
  • Unit 2: Cell Structure and Function
  • Unit 3: Cell Membrane and Transportation
  • Unit 4: Scientific Method and Homeostasis
  • Unit 5: Cell Cycle and Mitosis
  • Unit 6: DNA Structures and Processes
  • Unit 7: Meiosis and Inherited Traits
  • Unit 8: Creation versus Evolution
  • Unit 9: Introduction to Bioethics

Instructional Strategies:

  • Lecture
  • Class Discussion
  • Lab Work
  • Projects for Learning
  • Peer Collaboration and Discussion
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration

Minerology

Instructor: Derek Rinks
Prerequisites: None
Length of Course: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: An in-depth study of Earth’s geology and minerals. The course will begin with a study of minerals at the atomic level, then a study of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks including their formation. A special focus will be given to Colorado’s geology, including rock formation and mineral identification. The laboratory will primarily be hands on activities with rocks and minerals from Lutheran High’s own collection, as well as student’s building up their own collection.

Course Outcomes
Students will be able to

  • describe how the 3 main types of rocks (Igneous, Sedimentary, Metamorphic) are formed.
  • describe the composition of minerals by looking at the elements and how they bond.
  • make observations.
  • make inferences based on their observations.
  • identify an unknown mineral based on their observations and the mineral's properties.
  • go out in the field and collect their own samples.
  • correctly organize and label their own collection.
  • use various resources, intuition, and logic to solve problems.
Course Outline:
  • Unit 1: Introduction to Minerals
  • Unit 2: Atoms and Bonding
  • Unit 3: Physical Properties of Minerals
  • Unit 4: Crystal Structure
  • Unit 5: Identifying Minerals
  • Unit 6: Mineral Formation
  • Unit 7: Mineral Collecting
Instructional Strategies:
  • Lecture
  • Class Discussion
  • Lab Work
  • Small Group Activities/Projects
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration

Organic Chemistry

Instructor: Paul Blomenberg
Textbook: Notes and website only
Prerequisites: Inorganic Chemistry
Length of Course: 1 Semester, 0.5 Credits
Course Description: Organic chemistry deals with the structure, naming methods, and reactions of organic compounds. “. . . for giving prudence to the simple, knowledge and discretion to the young-let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance” Proverbs 1:4-5

Course Outcomes:
Students will

  • Develop an attitude of curiosity and wonder when considering physical phenomena
  • Realize that the Lord caused all of these phenomena to exist for our benefit
  • Better understand molecular structure and the principles that govern the bonding of one atom to another
  • Know the nomenclature associated with organic compounds
  • Be able to determine the functional groups present in an organic compound
  • Understand how to write and identify organic reactions
  • Be able to use the four basic reaction mechanisms to synthesize organic compounds
  • Develop a greater respect for the glory and awe of our Creator

Performances:
Students will

  • Learn how to extract information from a variety of sources including information presented in class and the internet
  • Practice concepts learned through the completion of regular homework assignments
  • Take homework quizzes on a regular basis
  • Take tests after each unit
  • Learn how to progress though material at a college class pace
  • Learn how to study and gather information without the use of a textbook
  • Develop self motivation and responsibility required to progress through college level curriculum
Course Outline:
  • Unit 1: Structure and Bonding
  • Unit 2: Organic Compounds
  • Unit 3: Functional Groups
  • Unit 4: Organic Reactions
  • Unit 5: Reaction Mechanisms
  • Unit 6: Preparation of Organic Compounds
  • Unit 7: Bio Chemistry
Instructional Strategies:
  • Lecture
  • Class Discussion
  • Lab Work
  • Small Group Activities/Projects
  • Teacher/Student Demonstration

New Call-to-action